Alma Street, built on top of one of the defunct Brickyards.
Alma Street, built on top of one of the defunct Brickyards.

There  were two Brickyards in South Hylton.

One established by William Wakefield in 1851, was just north of the church. It closed when the clay ran out, probably before 1854 as Alma Street is built on the site, and the name Alma is associated with the Crimea War of 1854. This excavation left the church standing on a block of clay about 15 ft. higher than the level to the north and is the reason for the structural damage being suffered by that building.

The other Brickyard was where the British Legion Club now stands. This was owned in 1865 by Thomas Pratt. There was a limestone quarry alongside Keelman’s Lane which supplied dolomite to Washington Chemical Works and which employed a small number of Hylton men.